L[i/o]ving cities

Posts tagged ‘mobility’

THE HISTORY OF THE DUTCH BICYCLE SUCCESS

Here there is a video in which we can see the construction process of the Dutch bicycle infrastructure. The video is fine to see what different happenings are in the core of the urbanization processes that happen in our cities, you can see them in the video.

Besides of the historical resume of the process, it is really important to see that there are critical situations in which we have to change our ways of doing. The key for the Dutch bicycles were the amount of car deaths, the first oil crisis and a past history of bicycle use.

Nowadays we are having some of these critical situations as the second oil crisis, the congestion of our cities, the lack of public resources, etc. I think that all these facts are not a threat; I think that they are warnings that are telling us that our way of doing things is becoming obsolete. So we have to be conscious about the challenges that mobility has to face and, fortunately, we also have the key to go in a success direction as the Dutch did, or not.

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A car(e)free mobility

The possibilities that new technologies gives us to manage our mobility are amazing. A carefree society with a car-free mobility.

TO OWN OR TO USE, THAT IS THE CAR´S QUESTION

Here at City Lines I enjoy talking about some of the new paradigms that are arising in our society because the financial crisis, that we are still suffering, is a great opportunity to reflect on this type of issues. One of those paradigms that we are living is the one related with property.

The strongest example about the property crisis could be related with Cloud Computing. The new technologies are going through a new path where the consumer will have the use rights of the servers, software, hardware, contents, etc, but not the property rights of them.

As in the Cloud Computing example, transport is also facing the challenge of carsharing and carpooling policies as part of this property paradigm changes. As I try to analyze it, these new transport policies have several positive impacts into the economic, social and environmental criteria.

For instance, economically, if we share our cars, we will use them more efficiently, because they wouldn’t require so much “parking” time as they do now. Economically, as well, if you manage a great amount of cars you have a better bargaining power to obtain better prices or, alternatively, to have better technologies that will go on the direction of having a better environment.

Environmentally, managing a great car fleet also means that you can change them sooner and through that you can have the best environmental technologies. These car fleets also allow to program car replacements, which is a way to stabilize the car market. These can also be a good social criterion, because you can also stabilize the car labour market. Talking about social criteria, you can also say that sharing cars you, individually, can be more flexible if you have to change your place from a city to the countryside or vice versa.

I think that all these criteria are good to start a discussion about using or owning a car, but we have to be conscious about one last question, which is that when we are resigning to property, we are renouncing to the decision rights upon that good. So, for a good carsharing policy it is necessary that customers have a discount on the price of the service (use of cars) that will make it attractive to use them instead of to own them.

Well, I think that if you live in a rented flat you will understand it perfectly.

THE RISK OF EXCLUSION IN SUBURBS BY RISING TRANSPORT PRICES

In this post, I have linked to a video about the suburban housing problems and its relations with a new risk, the increasing of transportation cost. It’s a very illustrative example, sited in Phoenix but that could be sited anywhere, which doesn’t need further explication. Despite this, I think that the declarations of the Grossos family and the housing businessman are impressive.

Enjoy the video clicking here

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